Q&A Session

Q&A session with Ravi Kumar S., President, Infosys, and Bob Lord, SVP, Cognitive Applications & Ecosystems, IBM

Play Podcast

00:00
00:00


Transcript

  • 00:11
    Question

    Thank you, Bob. Thank you, Ravi. I'm Rohit, I lead the insurance practice at Infosys. A great conversation. Quick question for you because we talked about insurance clients, uh, and uh, I think you are betting big on Red Hat OpenShift as an orchestration platform. My question to you is how is the market reacting? Because now we are talking about you combining forces with GCP or AWS, Azure, how are these providers reacting to the orchestration side and then IBM Cloud at play?

  • Bob Lord
    00:39
    Bob Lord

    Yes. So it is interesting. So you know, Red Hat is running as its own independent company, which I think is really important for everyone to run. Jim is the CEO of the company. They run their company, they have a ton of partnerships with a lot of the other cloud providers. Remember what I’ve said, I said that the Red Hat OpenShift platform is a ubiquitous platform to run across all clouds, right? So we are not only suggesting that the only cloud will be IBM Public Cloud, right? So, so that any solution is going to actually we believe and we see in our clients today that they're using multiple clouds anyhow. So we're just trying to enable the orchestration of all of those cloud assets across. So the reaction from a Microsoft and the AWS has been actually supportive of it because they actually see the Red Hat OpenShift thing platform only getting more seeded into what they're developing and where they are and, and you know, look the cloud, you know, the hybrid cloud world is a, is a $3 trillion opportunity, right?

    So there's a lot of growth sort of in this hybrid cloud world. And quite honestly when you're talking about mission critical systems, right, there is a very different kind of secure cloud that you need for some of those mission critical systems to protect data. So you're gonna, there are gonna be different use cases. And I'd suggest to you that the IBM cloud is going to have a very specific use case, specifically around security that a lot of the other clouds don't have based on our history and who we are. So, you know, as a, as a CIO, you're going to want to be able to orchestrate across multiple clouds. I think. I think the days of selecting one cloud and saying you're going to be on one cloud has gone. Um, yeah. There may be some new age companies that have made that decision a long time ago. They've found that they're stuck now they're stuck on a proprietary system.

  • Ravi Kumar S.
    02:23
    Ravi Kumar S.

    Actually they are moving from one, uh, you know, one lock-in into another lock-in. [BL: Yes]. In fact, at the last Red Hat Event, which happened in Boston, Ginni and Satya were both on the stage together, on a Red Hat event. So yes, it's changing times.

  • Bob Lord
    02:40
    Bob Lord

    Yeah. It does, it does say as this growth is so important. I mean, our big mission is just as, uh, rail is to Linux, OpenShift needs to be to kubernetes. Like that's that. That's really what we're, we need to focus. So a lot of the area that we're going to be working with you is all about Red Hat OpenShift. And how do we get Red Hat OpenShift more ubiquitously within your thought process to make your development activities faster and more secure. And then how do you leverage the IBM cloud packs where it's appropriate to leverage those cloud packs.

  • 03:15
    Question

    So I have a vested interest in the ecosystem activities. I’m interested to gain your perspective, Bob, you know, to build off of the Red Hat element. You know, we've seen, you know, lots of sub eco systems forming with our partners. You know, Adobe, SAP, Microsoft, Oracle just announced something this week with VMware that I think is, it's probably duplicating perhaps what IBM already has in place with, with VMware. But this opportunity, uh, that Red Hat is bringing from the ISVs to the SIs, like Infosys to the resellers, etc. What has changed do you think as a result of the Red Hat, um, you know, acquisition as far as how you view partnerships?

  • Bob Lord
    03:57
    Bob Lord

    Yeah. Um, so you know, number one, Red Hat has done such a great job with the ecosystem, right? When I look at sort of what Jim has built and how they activate around those partners and it was the fundamental piece of how they actually grew. So I think it is really, Dave, to your question, it is something we're learning from, you know, if I look at sort of what Red Hat has done and how they've developed these, these partnerships, when you look at the different class of partners, whether you talk about from a GSI standpoint, when you talk about ISVs or whether you talk about the VARs and the VADs, there is different approaches to all of those. Um, and how we're going to go forward and what we do with you in building these practice areas is going to be very different than what I end up doing with an embedded ISV is different than how we're working with VARs and VADs. But the most important thing is, and I think this is the thing that fundamentally changes it all is the lead there is Red Hat OpenShift. We are now as IBM have a product that we are all talking about around Red Hat OpenShift and these cloud packs. So there's a very simple story about now the approach may be different, what practice areas we set up with you as emphasis versus what I'm doing with an embedded ISV will be different. But the ultimate goal is to get our infrastructure in place as the seed because that is ultimately the growth strategy as Red Hat OpenShift gets established within all of our enterprises and all of our clients. Then my Sterling application, which I'm going to be launching October 8th, right? That's going to be based on Red Hat OpenShift is a natural end supply chain product for somebody to look at because you're going to be able to containerize your data strategy across the Red Hat OpenShift platform. So that's the, that's the growth strategy to go after. And I think it's a very fundamental change for IBM to really think about that one's product strategy going forward.

  • 05:48
    Question

    Sure. Hi, my name is Jamie. Welcome. We've seen in the Infosys hubs strategy, a lot of regional economic impact from influencing the curricula of colleges to opening up new job opportunities that didn't exist before. So I'm really passionate about how this exciting partnership between, you know, major employers and technology companies is having positive economic impact. You touched on one comment, which is breaking through silos of, um, socially oriented powerhouses, but, um, in your vast journeys, you know, and, uh, visits with a lot of different companies. Can you shed any more light about what you're seeing on economic impact, um, through IBM or others?

  • Bob Lord
    06:31
    Bob Lord

    Yeah, so you know, what I love about what I do love about IBM is its, sort of its storied pasts and, um, what we've done sort of in the area of education, um, and I was actually just talking with Ravi about, we have a program called P Tech or pathway to technologies. And, uh, Ginni Rometty is very, very clear that we need to skill up the workforce in order for them to embrace the technologies at scale, whatever economic area you're in. And we now have over 200, uh, P tech schools, which are high school based schools. If you add one more year, you actually become a developer, cloud native developer and you can get a job at IBM or you can get a job anywhere else. Right? So you sort of think about it as a vocational program. You're adding one more year to your school. Um, I, and we've talked, how do we partner together where your innovation centers are so we can actually learn from the P Tech programs or our apprentice program or any of those kinds of programs and pull it in through this innovation center with you so we can jointly help one another. Because our programs, they've been in place, they're proven, we know how they work. Um, and that's something that we can probably leverage together to accelerate some of the things that you guys are doing in these local areas. Um, and, are we training program? You know, we're, we're taking people who have jobs at Starbucks and retraining them. We have mothers who have been out on maternity leave for a period of time and they're afraid to come back because they may not know the technology. We basically give them, you know, a back to work period of time, like six months of training. So they feel good about when they come back into work to IBM. So there's a lot of programs I think we could potentially leverage together through the partnership, specifically in the six, you know, centers and areas where you guys are focused, where maybe we're not or where we've overlapped. For example, Raleigh, we overlap. So how are we actually helping to lift all boats together? And I think that's an exciting opportunity for us to explore together.

  • 08:25
    Question

    I find that fascinating. With having vocational school, but not everybody could get into the program. You know, there's just so many people. So for those that are maybe beyond the age of school or just can't get into that program, , the way I was thinking of it is in ‘The Graduate,’ Dustin Hoffman is trying to find his way. And the answer is plastics. Right? So that may or may not have been true, but to someone today that it's like, you know, there's, there's so much out there, so you know, different languages, different architectures, things like that at a macro level, if somebody you know, wants to start and then, and then really focus, could you give some guidance on that?

  • Bob Lord
    09:24
    Bob Lord

    Oh God, that's a very broad question. You know, I do see the world of development and data science merging. Um, I you know, I don't, I am not sure you can be a great developer without actually having some kind of data science skills and you clearly can't be a great data scientist without having core development skills. So I do, I mean, that's a very broad answer to your question, but in this world of data science, there is not enough people, um, who understand the fundamentals of data science to actually do the machine learning, to actually figure out how we actually responsibly use AI. And I think that that's a really, really rich area. So let's say, you know, years ago you sort of were a math major, like, well, brush up those skills on data science and learn the new languages.

    Like that is an area that I don't think we can, we have enough skills to go around in general. And data is going to transform who we are as human beings. And it just, even like I mentioned about Call for Code, a lot of the data work that they're doing there is looking at weather data right from the weather company that we own. They were looking at that weather data to actually do predictive models to know whether or not there's going to be a natural disaster and whether or not you actually have to fill up, you know, get more drugs into the system or get a blood supply from the red cross to an affected area before the hurricane hits. Right. And that's all based on data and it's all based on data science. Okay.

  • Ravi Kumar S.
    10:55
    Ravi Kumar S.

    Thank you so much. Thanks Bob. That was a very exciting Q and A.