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An ally is a verb, so there are actions: Egle Bronzini of Roche

In a deep dive into the importance of building diversity in an organization, being a leader and an ally, Roche’s Egle Bronzini shares her candid thoughts with Infosys’ Dena Tahmasebi.

Highlights

  • “Don't be afraid, because…the way you will project yourself is going to have an equal impact on everyone else listening to you.” – Egle Bronzini of Roche
  • “It's really about thinking of your career as a long-term game.”
  • “If you work hard, and if you show up and do your best, eventually things come together for you.”

As the head of Global Infrastructure and Solutions at Roche, Egle Bronzini takes the work “ally” very seriously.

“For me being an ally of diversity and inclusion, alights a verb. So, there are actions.” says Bronzini.

In a deep dive with Dena Tahmasebi of Infosys, Bronzini emphasizes that actions are needed to reach an environment of equality.

“But we are not there yet,” she notes, while adding that she takes an extra step and makes sure she reaches out, communicates, and shares her own experiences.

“Really trying to show more perspective and trying to give a little bit of extra help, in the moment that it matters,” says Bronzini.

At a time when discussions around diversity and inclusion are taking the form of serious conversations, leaders such as Bronzini are utilizing their voice of authority and are ensuring that they take individual steps to help organizations progress.

Bronzini has 25 years of experience in Pharma IT and holds a master's degree in electrical and electronics engineering.

“For me, my confidence comes from the fact that I have done my homework. And I know I'm the expert and I know more on the topic than anyone else in the room,” Egle Bronzini.

As a leader Bronzini carries her real persona at work, which is about having fun, while working hard.

“I tend to dramatize and I'm always up for a good laugh... At the same time. I'm also very focused and very hard working,” she candidly shares.

On being asked if men and women lead differently, she notes that women, perhaps, pay more attention, and bring empathy to their leadership style.

“Also, the female ability to really impact the mood of the whole room by bringing more of a human touch in the business, especially now that we are no longer working face to face,” she says.

She also feels that there is a difference between how men and women look at their careers.

“I find that maybe for male colleagues, this ladder… is more accentuated,” she says, while adding that when it comes to females, finding purpose, motivation, and the energy to go the extra mile is driven by reasons more than money and even more than hierarchy.

Also watch: Dena Tahmasebi discusses with technology professional, Jen Mossop Scott, the value of mentorship while building diversity and encouraging curiosity

Bronzini also values the importance of mentorship and says that she has had several in her life. She mentions Mary LeBlanc who helped her make a decision that would have far-reaching impacts on her career, as well as personal life.

“She really helped me to think about that career in a much broader way… It was a big thing for me, but she really gave me the confidence and she gave me a different perspective that I didn't have,” elaborates Bronzini.

Tahmasebi asked Bronzini about building one’s confidence in a room full of people who are different. To which she replied that one should realize that they are experts in their space.

“For me, my confidence comes from the fact that I have done my homework. And I know I'm the expert and I know more on the topic than anyone else in the room,” says Bronzini adding, “Come prepared, of course, and then do your best, and (know that) you are the best one in the room at that moment.”

“So, don't be afraid, because…the way you will project yourself is going to have an equal impact on everyone else listening to you,” she says.

“Remember, it's not only the leader, because we really, truly, lead from any seat. And it's up to each of us to create an environment where people feel accepted, they feel that they contribute. They find the purpose,” says Egle Bronzini.

She also suggests that one of the most important parts, and also the most difficult one, is to detach from the outcome.

“It's really about thinking of your career as a long-term game,” says Bronzini, adding, “Don't live in the moment. Think about tomorrow and the day after tomorrow. Think about the learning… As long as you showed up, and you have done your best just detach from the outcome.”

Bronzini believes that building diversity in an organization, and retaining a diverse talent pool, is not just about a leader but is up to each of us.

“Remember, it's not only the leader, because we really, truly, lead from any seat. And it's up to each of us to create an environment where people feel accepted, they feel that they contribute. They find the purpose,” says Bronzini.

“And that's the most meaningful way to really drive the commitment to join, and to stay,” she adds.

But what is Bronzini’s message to all the young women who would aspire to become like her?

“I don't consider myself a role model. But I made it to a point where I can make a difference for other women,” she says, while adding that one should keep working hard.

“If you work hard, and if you show up and do your best, eventually things come together for you… Don't go to conclusion just based on the moment and think of it as a long journey” says Bronzini.

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