Life Sciences

The Future of Medicine is seen as mapping of individual genetic make-up and medication personalized to a patients needs. It's exciting and daunting times for the pharmaceutical industry to leverage technology and offer tailor-made medicines to an increasingly fragmented and smaller subsection of patients.

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Subhro Mallik

Business View

Subhro Mallik, Vice President and Head, Life Sciences, Infosys                                

"Personalized medicine is on its way to becoming a reality, and technology is playing a crucial role in this journey. Technology is providing the biopharmaceutical industry with necessary insights and tools, helping them navigate the new and complex paradigm of drug research and development."


Modern medicine saves millions of lives each year, and we are just getting started on treating some of the complex conditions affecting a smaller patient population. New approach to medicine leveraging pharmacogenomics is promising to bring targeted therapies to patients based on their phenotypic, lifestyle, environmental and genetic conditions.

Personalized medicine is on its way to becoming a reality, and technology is playing a crucial role in this journey. Technology is providing the biopharmaceutical industry with necessary insights and tools, helping them navigate the new and complex paradigm of drug research and development.

In the near future, increasing computing power will be able to quickly sequence genomes, profile individuals across an increasingly complex set of parameters, and determine the right type and dosage of medicine suited for their personalized requirement. Gadgets such as wearables will offer collaborative health related data on individuals and enable real-time tracking of the therapeutic effects of medication.

Technical View

Siva Nandiwada, Associate Vice President and Global Delivery Head– Healthcare and Life Sciences, Infosys

"The future of medicine will leverage the precision medicine paradigm and apply today's technologies to understand the causes and help prevent these conditions in the first place."


Demand for better treatment is increasing many folds with the prevalence of chronic conditions that are impacting large populations. Medicines today still treat these diseases, even while there is an opportunity to prevent these in the first place.

We believe that with lower cost of genome sequencing and technology becoming more accessible, the future of medicine will leverage the precision medicine paradigm and apply today's technologies to understand the causes and help prevent these conditions in the first place. A huge promise in improving quality of life and help the health systems make healthcare affordable.
Ravinder Singh

Domain View

Ravinder Singh, Industry Principal and Head of Life Sciences Domain Consulting, Infosys

"Key to personalized medicine lies in our ability to translate the ever growing understanding of biological science to targeted and safe treatments for patients."


Key to personalized medicine lies in our ability to translate the ever growing understanding of biological science to targeted and safe treatments for patients.

Imagine the computing needs to make the new paradigm of medicine a reality - processing humongous and rapidly changing biological, chemical, environmental data sets and facilitating multi-disciplinary collaboration across research and development.

ICT is becoming more and more significant to the new paradigm of medicine and continues to innovate to help bring treatments faster to patients.
Alan Louie

Industry Analyst View

Alan Louie, Research Director - IDC Health Insights                                

"The Future of Medicine will be built on the ability to more routinely deliver optimal outcomes based on patient-specific clinical (including genomic) and life data and knowledge."


The Future of Medicine will be built on the ability to more routinely deliver optimal outcomes based on patient-specific clinical (including genomic) and life data and knowledge.

A new and transformed life sciences industry is needed to enable this capability, with expectations for the increasing blurring of the lines between the life sciences and healthcare.

IDC expects that strong support and empowerment from scientific, technological, and IT advances will help to catalyze needed changes as we enter into the age of precision medicine and an N of 1.