Healthcare

With new digital and omni-channel technologies, Healthcare industry has become more 'consumerized' than ever. But how can we improve and yet control costs to make it universally accessible?

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Sanjay Dalwani

Business View

Sanjay Dalwani, Vice President and Head - Healthcare, Infosys        

"It is imperative for healthcare companies to recognize these changing consumer expectations and use meaningful interactions, in real-time, and through high-quality user experiences."


While the potential of digitization is widely recognized in the Healthcare industry, progress has been modest thus far. In order to become truly universal, digital care needs to go beyond the four walls of hospitals and 24/7/365 patient care, and embrace massive collaboration. However, in the absence of tangible evidence of long-term, sustainable value, nobody is putting their bucks on 'collaborative care'.

Today, consumers, driven by a retail mindset, are demanding usability, convenience and productivity. With the industry’s ongoing shift to high deductible health plans, consumers mandatorily have to shop smart and make informed choices about where, how and from whom to receive care. It is imperative for healthcare companies to recognize these changing consumer expectations and use meaningful interactions, in real-time, and through high-quality user experiences.
Siva Nandiwada

Technical View

Siva Nandiwada, Associate Vice President and Global Delivery Head – Healthcare and Life Sciences, Infosys

"Technology has a significant role to play in bringing about synergies among stakeholders, which has the potential to bring down the cost of care."


The Healthcare Industry has not adequately integrated to offer accountable care. The various stakeholders, be it payers, providers and patients, still function in relative silos and this lack of collaboration is resulting in higher cost of care. Technology has a significant role to play in bringing about synergies among stakeholders, which has the potential to bring down the cost of care. As healthcare becomes consumerized, providers and payers must educate consumers on the various aspects of healthcare in order to make the process of accessing healthcare transparent and simple.
Deepak Agarwal

Domain View

Deepak Agarwal, Senior Consultant – Business Consulting, Infosys        

"We have realized that an ecosystem of digital-health services must be built on an open innovation platform that facilitates easy, secured and relevant exchange of health data among healthcare entities."


Working closely with our clients, we have realized that an ecosystem of digital-health services must be built on an open innovation platform that facilitates easy, secured and relevant exchange of health data among healthcare entities. This calls for phenomenal standardization of health data, including medical records, members' socio-economic records, and administrative data such as claims.

If built on such innovative platforms, digital health apps - which are proliferating and rapidly adopted by consumers - will bear tangible results in health improvement. For example, physicians can be compensated based on the effectiveness of treatment (quality), and not merely by the number of procedures completed (quantity).

Such platforms will enable automation of processes, data-driven decision making, insights about physiology, psychology and behavioral aspects of consumers and patients, through analytics and A.I. Thus, medical resources could dedicate time to medical research and unique cases. Moreover, these platforms could revolutionize health service usage, help introduce a value- based digital health reimbursement model, and help the system bend the cost curve.
Barbra McGann

Industry Analyst View

Barbra McGann, Chief Research Officer, HfS Research                         

Effective use of all these technology options requires that we continue to change the way that we work, and the way that we work together in the healthcare industry.


The answer is in the power of partnership. Digital technology and our use of it is becoming increasingly sophisticated and woven into our lives, but the real value and impact it can have in healthcare is when it is used in a partnership focused on addressing a particular issue, such as reducing re-admissions in remote areas, or increasing medical adherence. Effective use of all these technology options requires that we continue to change the way that we work, and the way that we work together in the healthcare industry. The real impact will come as a result of collaboration.